Category Archives: Employment Law

Finally an end to the gig-economy worker conundrum?

The Supreme Court’s Judgment in Pimlico Plumbers and another v Gary Smith could spell an end to gig-economy ‘jobs loophole’ being used to avoid worker status. The Supreme Court’s dismissal of Pimlico’s recent appeal has confirmed that their workers are … Continue reading

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How to Suspend an Employee Lawfully

Often seen as a protective measure, suspension is primarily used by employers to carry out investigations into allegations of misconduct in instances where the employee’s continued presence may impede those investigations or pose a risk to the interests of the … Continue reading

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Sleeping on the Job: Government suspends National Minimum Wage enforcement for Sleep-in pay in the Social Care Sector

On 26 July 2017 the Government announced that it had temporarily suspended enforcement activity and that it was officially waiving historic financial penalties owed by employers who have underpaid their workers for overnight sleep-in shifts before this date.  It has … Continue reading

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Uber loses landmark Employment Tribunal case on worker status

The London Employment Tribunal recently decided that drivers working for the taxi hailing app Uber fell fully within the definition of a ‘worker’ for purposes of the Employment Rights Act 1996.  They dismissed as ‘faintly ridiculous’ Uber’s assertion that the … Continue reading

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Tattoo’ll do nicely! Or will it?

Research published this week by the conciliation service, Acas, suggests that some UK employers’ attitudes towards people with tattoos are becoming outdated – and those employers are missing out on talent. In recent years tattoos have broken into the mainstream … Continue reading

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Taxation of settlement payments

There are a number of dates you might want to save for April 2018: the Commonwealth Games in Australia, the Rugby World Cup Sevens in San Francisco or the Grand National at Aintree. What you perhaps didn’t know is that … Continue reading

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If it ain’t broke, should British football Brexit?

The right of citizens of European Union (“EU”) member states to move freely about Europe for employment purposes is one of the four fundamental freedoms guaranteed by the EU and in the world of football, is at the heart of … Continue reading

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Contracts can be a bind

I recently posted a blog on restrictive covenants and the government’s view that they may be stifling competition.  This question has to be debated and resolved but for now restrictive covenants remain part of the employment landscape. I regularly advise … Continue reading

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No Heels Required? Keeping Your Workplace Dress Code Within the Law

In light of recent headlines regarding Nicola Thorp, a receptionist sent home from work without pay after refusing to wear high heels, many employers may be looking to review the dress code requirements they set for their staff.  Ms Thorp’s … Continue reading

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Non-competition clauses might stifle innovation?

A recent government press release from the Department for Business Innovation and Skills (DBIS) has pledged to act on non-competition and non-solicitation clauses (restrictive covenants) that could be stifling British innovation.  The press release is also a call for evidence … Continue reading

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